CannaTrials adheres to evidence-based medicine – making statements based on medical evidence.

This page is excerpted and quoted from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.    A Committee of over 40 experts, researchers, and reviewers in The Health and Medicine Division published a 486 page report in 2017 entitled “The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research.
If you would like to access the entire report you may do so by clicking this link.

Medical Marijuana and Glaucoma

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness within the United States (Mayo Clinic, 2015). This disorder is characterized as a group of eye conditions that can produce damage to the optic nerve and result in a loss of vision. This damage is often caused by abnormally high intraocular pressure (NEI, n.d.). Because high intraocular pressure is a known major risk factor that can be controlled (Prum et al., 2016, p. 52), most treatments have been designed to reduce it. Research suggests that cannabinoids may have potential as an effective treatment for reducing pressure in the eye (Tomida et al., 2007).

Lower intraocular pressure is a key target for glaucoma treatments. Non-randomized studies in healthy volunteers and glaucoma patients have shown short-term reductions in intraocular pressure with oral, topical eye drops, and intravenous cannabinoids, suggesting the potential for therapeutic benefit (IOM, 1999, pp. 174–175). A good-quality systemic review identified a single small trial that found no effect of two cannabinoids, given as an oromucosal spray, on intraocular pressure (Whiting et al., 2015). The quality of evidence for the finding of no effect is limited. However, to be effective, treatments targeting lower intraocular pressure must provide continual rather than transient reductions in intraocular pressure. To date, those studies showing positive effects have shown only short-term benefit on intraocular pressure (hours), suggesting a limited potential for cannabinoids in the treatment of glaucoma.

CONCLUSION 4-14 There is limited evidence that cannabinoids are an ineffective treatment for improving intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma. [1]

[1] The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research | The National Academies Press. 2017. Pages 113-114. Download the complete 486 page report.

Would YOU like to participate in a cannabis clinical trial near you?

Click the button below that tells us who you are, and we’ll send you to a new page that’s best for you.  I am a:

Join Us Today

Get Email Updates and News customized for your Interests...