CannaTrials adheres to evidence-based medicine – making statements based on medical evidence.

This page is excerpted and quoted from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.    A Committee of over 40 experts, researchers, and reviewers in The Health and Medicine Division published a 486 page report in 2017 entitled “The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research.
If you would like to access the entire report you may do so by clicking this link.

Medical Marijuana and Cognition

“Despite what appears, on first glance, to be a very broad existing literature, a surprisingly small number of empirical studies have examined how cannabis impacts the psychosocial domains targeted here. The questions addressed in this section revolve around how cannabis affects three aspects of cognition—memory, learning, and attention—areas that have continued to be prevalent across the self-report, neuropsychological, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature since the mid-1970s. Furthermore, these are aspects of cognition that are often explored in other studies. In other words, evaluation of these aspects of cognition increases the potential to compare these findings to other studies, including the 10-year prospective examination of 10,000 youths across 21 sites (the ABCD study; Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, 2016). In terms of the relevance of these aspects of cognition, the domains of learning, memory, and attention are central, as they undergird an individual’s success—or failure—across such areas as academic, employment, and social/relationship functioning. This subsequently renders these three domains of cognition strong proxies for examining interference in functioning, one of the key metrics of cannabis use disorder symptomology according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V).

These domains are defined broadly in order to be as inclusive as possible of how they were measured within the included systematic analyses and component primary manuscripts, and to allow maximal potential for generalization to the broader literature. Thus, within this review, “memory” is defined as the wide array of function that involves the abilities to remember, temporarily store, more extensively store, process, manipulate, recall, and reproduce data (e.g., verbal, auditory, written). In this review, “learning” is defined as the wide array of function that involves the ability to observe, comprehend, absorb, and appropriate new information into an individual’s cognitive repertoire (e.g., verbal, auditory, visual). Finally, in this review, “attention” is defined as an individual’s ability to stay focused on the task at hand without being distracted but also to be cognitively flexible enough to transfer to a different task or set of information when the time requires (e.g., including brain regions relevant to visual, auditory, and verbal processing as well as executive control).

To investigate how cannabis affects these three domains of human cognition (memory, learning, attention), a search was conducted to identify systematic reviews of the existing published literature since the publication of Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base, the last Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on marijuana (1999). There were a total of 94 systematic reviews identified that responded to the topic of cannabis and cognition during the period of 2000–2016. Of these, 5 systematic reviews were considered of good quality (Batalla et al., 2013; Broyd et al., 2016; Grant et al., 2003; Martin-Santos et al., 2010; Schreiner and Dunn, 2012). No primary manuscripts were utilized in this section because all study questions were addressed by the systematic reviews.

In contrast to other sections of this report, given the diversity of the metrics and constructs in learning, memory, and attention, and the different coverage of these domains within the 5 different systematic reviews, we present summaries from each of the systematic reviews in these domains rather than only presenting one representative systematic review for the topic area of cognition. Furthermore, reflective of the field of cognition at this time, the presented systematic reviews reflect data from the fields of neuropsychology, computer-administered cognitive tests, as well as brain structure and function (e.g., MRI/fMRI). The latter represent some of our most contemporary, sensitive, and specific metrics of cognitive function at this time.

It should be noted that Chapter 12 (Mental Health) highlights the multidirectional and complex relationship between cannabis use and cannabis use disorder and cognitive performance among individuals with psychotic disorders. For further information on this topic, please refer to Chapter 12.

The collection of systematic reviews used in this chapter represents a large body of work. The Broyd et al. (2016) systematic review is the most recent, evaluating 3,021 total manuscripts, yielding a final number of 105 manuscripts in their review. Within their systematic review, they evaluated cannabis’s interference with cognition across a number of assessment methodologies. Furthermore, they evaluated the impact of these cognitive domains across developmental periods, including adolescence, emerging adulthood, and adulthood (for additional information about developmental implications among adolescents, see Box 11-1). Batalla and colleagues began with 142 studies, which they narrowed to 43 manuscripts. As with the Broyd et al. (2016) team, Batalla et al. (2013) included studies  across the age span, including adolescents and adults. One of the older systematic reviews, Grant et al. (2003), commenced their review with 1,830 manuscripts, which were reduced to a group of 117 papers in their final evaluation. Martin-Santos et al. (2010) began their examination with 66 manuscripts, which resulted in a final set of 41 studies of cannabis’s effect on cognition. Schreiner and Dunn (2012) started with more than 800 studies, which they narrowed to a final set of 13 studies.

In these systematic reviews, “acute” generally reflects cognitive domains assessed within a short window (often within several hours) immediately after cannabis use. The individual may or may not still be intoxicated during this examination. In contrast, “sustained” generally reflects cognitive domains assessed after a period of abstinence from cannabis. Within the reviewed studies, that ranges from several hours to months after discontinuing cannabis use.

In sum, within the domain of learning, the Broyd et al. (2016) systematic review and the component study highlighted within that review showed strong data for the acute (immediate) impact of cannabis use on  learning. However, results from three systematic reviews (Batalla et al., 2013; Broyd et al., 2016; Martin-Santos et al., 2010) reflected limited to no support for the association between the sustained effects of cannabis use after cessation and the cognitive domain of learning. Similarly, for the domain of memory, the Broyd et al. (2016) systematic review and the component study within it showed moderate to strong evidence for the acute (immediate) impact of cannabis use on memory. However, as with learning, there were limited to no data to support the association between the sustained effects of cannabis use after cessation and the cognitive domain of memory in the three systematic reviews that addressed this question (Batalla et al., 2013; Broyd et al., 2016; Martin-Santos et al., 2010). Of interest, the neuroimaging studies reflected that while there was no difference in terms of performance on memory tasks, cannabis users may recruit different parts of their brain to achieve equivalent performance to control subjects on these tasks, suggesting the need to examine how cannabis may impact the neural regions that drive the processing of memory in future research. Finally, for the domain of attention, the Broyd et al. (2016) systematic review showed strong evidence for the acute (immediate) impact of cannabis on attention. However, as with the other domains, the evidence from other systematic reviews (Batalla et al., 2013; Broyd et al., 2016; Grant et al., 2003; Martin-Santos et al., 2010; Schreiner and Dunn, 2012) suggest that there were limited to no data to support the association between the sustained effects of cannabis use after cessation and the cognitive domain of attention.

CONCLUSION 11-1
11-1(a) There is moderate evidence of a statistical association between acute cannabis use and impairment in the cognitive domains of learning, memory, and attention.
11-1(b) There is limited evidence of a statistical association between sustained abstinence from cannabis use and impairments in the cognitive domains of learning, memory, and attention. [1]

[1] The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research | The National Academies Press. 2017. Pages 268-275. Download the complete 486 page report.

**Important Note:  On many of the health conditions studied by NAS, there was no conclusive evidence of cannabis effectiveness from the study results they reviewed.  The authors included a long section on “research gaps.

It is the Vision and Mission of CannaTrials to fill in some of these research gaps with cannabis clinical trials using specific medical marijuana formulations and testing them in a research protocol with local patients, physicians, processors and dispensaries.  If you are interested in participating in a clinical trial, and helping improve scientific knowledge about health effects of cannabis, please click one of the buttons below on this page.

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